Day 6: Inspecting a “soddy”

Trixie and Pops rest outside the large "soddy" - it was very large compared to others we saw later.

Trixie and Pops rest outside the large “soddy” – it was very large compared to others we saw later.

We walked on to view the ‘soddy’ behind the hogun – this is a replica of a pioneer house further away from the river, where timber was scarce and expensive. The solution was to cut the sod itself to create thick bricks to build up into a home, measuring about 12 x 12 feet. About an acre of sod was required, and the sod would have to be cut and built all at once, since the blocks would dry and crumble if left for more than a day. The roots of the grass helped make these blocks hold together, and the sod applied to the roof was planted with grass or flowers. The resulting home in this case was made of blocks that were 90% soil and 10% Portland cement provided a warm home for the settlers, if a bit dirty and buggy.

We took plenty of photos before returning to the car. With less than twenty minutes before the place opened, we opted to stay and go through; it was well worth the effort.

We went into the museum, Trixie in her cart, and passed her off to the proprietors as a service dog. Preferring the rewards of a ticket sale over the wrath of the health inspector, they let us pass, and Trixie performed admirably, even though the walk-through dioramas featured sound effects equal to anything Disney might have belted out.

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